Changes in patellofemoral pain resulting from repetitive impact landings are associated with the magnitude and rate of patellofemoral joint loading

Lee T. Atkins, C. Roger James, Hyung Suk Yang, Phillip S. Sizer, Jean Michel Brismée, Steven F. Sawyer, Christopher M. Powers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Although a relationship between elevated patellofemoral forces and pain has been proposed, it is unknown which joint loading variable (magnitude, rate) is best associated with pain changes. The purpose of this study was to examine associations among patellofemoral joint loading variables and changes in patellofemoral pain across repeated single limb landings. Methods: Thirty-one females (age: 23.5(2.8) year; height: 166.8(5.8) cm; mass: 59.6(8.1) kg) with PFP performed 5 landing trials from 0.25 m. The dependent variable was rate of change in pain obtained from self-reported pain scores following each trial. Independent variables included 5-trial averages of peak, time-integral, and average and maximum development rates of the patellofemoral joint reaction force obtained using a previously described model. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate individual associations between rate of change in pain and each independent variable (α = 0.05). Stepwise linear multiple regression (α enter = 0.05; α exit = 0.10) was used to identify the best predictor of rate of change in pain. Findings: Subjects reported an average increase of 0.38 pain points with each landing trial. Although, rate of change in pain was positively correlated with peak force (r = 0.44, p = 0.01), and average (r = 0.41, p = 0.02) and maximum force development rates (r = 0.39, p = 0.03), only the peak force entered the predictive model explaining 19% of variance in rate of change in pain (r 2 = 0.19, p = 0.01). Interpretation: Peak patellofemoral joint reaction force was the best predictor of the rate of change in pain following repetitive singe limb landings. The current study supports the theory that patellofemoral joint loading contributes to changes in patellofemoral pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-36
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Biomechanics
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Kinetics
  • Patella
  • Patellofemoral joint reaction force

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