Cardiovascular responses to voluntary and nonvoluntary static exercise in humans

D. B. Friedman, C. Peel, J. H. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have measured the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and nonvoluntary (electrically induced) one-leg static exercise in humans. Eight normal subjects were studied at rest and during 5 min of static leg extension at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction performed voluntarily and nonvoluntarily in random order. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output (CO) were determined, and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) and stroke volume (SV) were calculated. HR increased from ~65 ± 3 beats/min at rest to 80 ± 4 and 78 ± 6 beats/min (P < 0.05), and MAP increased from 83 ± 6 to 103 ± 6 and 105 ± 6 mmHg (P < 0.05) during voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. CO increased from 5.1 ± 0.7 to 6.0 ± 0.8 and 6.2 ± 0.8 l/min (P < 0.05) during voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. PVR and SV did not change significantly during voluntary or nonvoluntary contractions. Thus the cardiovascular responses were not different between voluntary and electrically induced contractions. These results suggest that the increases in CO, HR, SV, MAP, and PVR during 5 min of static contractions can be elicited without any contribution from a central neural mechanism (central command). However, central command could still have an important role during voluntary static exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1982-1985
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume73
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1992

Keywords

  • central command
  • electrical stimulation
  • reflex control

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