Buffering chronic kidney disease with sodium bicarbonate

Emily N. Williams, Keisa Mathis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The roles of the kidney are well defined, if there is a progressive loss in renal function, the kidney is no longer able to perform the listed tasks and chronic kidney disease (CKD) persists. In both clinical and experimental studies, NaHCO3 supplementation has been shown to improve glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as well as halt the progression toward end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In an article recently published in Clinical Science (vol 132 (11) 1179-1197), Ray et al. presented an intriguing and timely study, which investigates the mechanisms involved in the protection that follows oral NaHCO3 ingestion. Here we comment on their research findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1999-2001
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Science
Volume132
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2018

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Sodium Bicarbonate
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Kidney
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Chronic Kidney Failure
Eating
Research

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Williams, Emily N. ; Mathis, Keisa. / Buffering chronic kidney disease with sodium bicarbonate. In: Clinical Science. 2018 ; Vol. 132, No. 17. pp. 1999-2001.
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Buffering chronic kidney disease with sodium bicarbonate. / Williams, Emily N.; Mathis, Keisa.

In: Clinical Science, Vol. 132, No. 17, 01.09.2018, p. 1999-2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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