Behavioral comparisons in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder

A systematic literature review

Priscila Caçola, Haylie Lauren Miller, Peace Ossom Williamson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are developmental disorders that, since the DSM-5, can be diagnosed as co-occurring conditions. While some recent studies suggest that ASD and DCD have similar traits, others show clear behavioral distinctions between the two conditions. By gathering all studies that included (1) an ASD group and a DCD group, (2) an ASD + DCD group and a DCD group, or (3) ASD, ASD + DCD, and DCD groups, we aimed to identify similarities and differences in behaviors between the two disorders. Method We used a systematic search of PubMed (1946 –), Scopus (1970 –), PsycINFO (via EBSCO, 1600 –), CINAHL (via EBSCO, 1937 –), SportDiscus (via EBSCO, 1985 –), and WorldCat (via FirstSearch) in addition to reference list and author name searching PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and WorldCat to identify original studies that met the following criteria: (1) an ASD group and a DCD group, (2) an ASD + DCD group and a DCD group, or (3) ASD, ASD + DCD, and DCD groups. Results From the 1598 articles screened, 11 were included in the qualitative analysis. The articles included reported more differences than similarities in individuals with ASD and DCD, with clear distinctions for working memory ability, gestural performance, grip selection, and cortical thickness. Only two studies reported similarities in face processing abilities and perceived competence, and the interventional studies showed group similarities in behavior improvement, such as intelligence and attention. Conclusions Based on the articles reviewed, we conclude that while DCD and ASD share some behavioral symptoms, the symptom profiles of each disorder are unique and separable. We recommend that the evaluation of potential DCD in individuals with ASD be performed systematically and thoroughly, so as to distinguish this co-occurring condition from sensorimotor symptoms associated with ASD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-18
Number of pages13
JournalResearch in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Volume38
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2017

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Motor Skills Disorders
Aptitude
Autism Spectrum Disorder
PubMed
Behavioral Symptoms

Keywords

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Behaviors
  • Co-morbidities
  • Co-occurrence
  • Developmental Coordination Disorder
  • Motor skills
  • Systematic literature review

Cite this

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title = "Behavioral comparisons in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder: A systematic literature review",
abstract = "Background Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are developmental disorders that, since the DSM-5, can be diagnosed as co-occurring conditions. While some recent studies suggest that ASD and DCD have similar traits, others show clear behavioral distinctions between the two conditions. By gathering all studies that included (1) an ASD group and a DCD group, (2) an ASD + DCD group and a DCD group, or (3) ASD, ASD + DCD, and DCD groups, we aimed to identify similarities and differences in behaviors between the two disorders. Method We used a systematic search of PubMed (1946 –), Scopus (1970 –), PsycINFO (via EBSCO, 1600 –), CINAHL (via EBSCO, 1937 –), SportDiscus (via EBSCO, 1985 –), and WorldCat (via FirstSearch) in addition to reference list and author name searching PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and WorldCat to identify original studies that met the following criteria: (1) an ASD group and a DCD group, (2) an ASD + DCD group and a DCD group, or (3) ASD, ASD + DCD, and DCD groups. Results From the 1598 articles screened, 11 were included in the qualitative analysis. The articles included reported more differences than similarities in individuals with ASD and DCD, with clear distinctions for working memory ability, gestural performance, grip selection, and cortical thickness. Only two studies reported similarities in face processing abilities and perceived competence, and the interventional studies showed group similarities in behavior improvement, such as intelligence and attention. Conclusions Based on the articles reviewed, we conclude that while DCD and ASD share some behavioral symptoms, the symptom profiles of each disorder are unique and separable. We recommend that the evaluation of potential DCD in individuals with ASD be performed systematically and thoroughly, so as to distinguish this co-occurring condition from sensorimotor symptoms associated with ASD.",
keywords = "Autism Spectrum Disorder, Behaviors, Co-morbidities, Co-occurrence, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Motor skills, Systematic literature review",
author = "Priscila Ca{\cc}ola and Miller, {Haylie Lauren} and Williamson, {Peace Ossom}",
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Behavioral comparisons in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder : A systematic literature review. / Caçola, Priscila; Miller, Haylie Lauren; Williamson, Peace Ossom.

In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Vol. 38, 01.06.2017, p. 6-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Behavioral comparisons in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder

T2 - A systematic literature review

AU - Caçola, Priscila

AU - Miller, Haylie Lauren

AU - Williamson, Peace Ossom

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N2 - Background Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are developmental disorders that, since the DSM-5, can be diagnosed as co-occurring conditions. While some recent studies suggest that ASD and DCD have similar traits, others show clear behavioral distinctions between the two conditions. By gathering all studies that included (1) an ASD group and a DCD group, (2) an ASD + DCD group and a DCD group, or (3) ASD, ASD + DCD, and DCD groups, we aimed to identify similarities and differences in behaviors between the two disorders. Method We used a systematic search of PubMed (1946 –), Scopus (1970 –), PsycINFO (via EBSCO, 1600 –), CINAHL (via EBSCO, 1937 –), SportDiscus (via EBSCO, 1985 –), and WorldCat (via FirstSearch) in addition to reference list and author name searching PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and WorldCat to identify original studies that met the following criteria: (1) an ASD group and a DCD group, (2) an ASD + DCD group and a DCD group, or (3) ASD, ASD + DCD, and DCD groups. Results From the 1598 articles screened, 11 were included in the qualitative analysis. The articles included reported more differences than similarities in individuals with ASD and DCD, with clear distinctions for working memory ability, gestural performance, grip selection, and cortical thickness. Only two studies reported similarities in face processing abilities and perceived competence, and the interventional studies showed group similarities in behavior improvement, such as intelligence and attention. Conclusions Based on the articles reviewed, we conclude that while DCD and ASD share some behavioral symptoms, the symptom profiles of each disorder are unique and separable. We recommend that the evaluation of potential DCD in individuals with ASD be performed systematically and thoroughly, so as to distinguish this co-occurring condition from sensorimotor symptoms associated with ASD.

AB - Background Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are developmental disorders that, since the DSM-5, can be diagnosed as co-occurring conditions. While some recent studies suggest that ASD and DCD have similar traits, others show clear behavioral distinctions between the two conditions. By gathering all studies that included (1) an ASD group and a DCD group, (2) an ASD + DCD group and a DCD group, or (3) ASD, ASD + DCD, and DCD groups, we aimed to identify similarities and differences in behaviors between the two disorders. Method We used a systematic search of PubMed (1946 –), Scopus (1970 –), PsycINFO (via EBSCO, 1600 –), CINAHL (via EBSCO, 1937 –), SportDiscus (via EBSCO, 1985 –), and WorldCat (via FirstSearch) in addition to reference list and author name searching PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and WorldCat to identify original studies that met the following criteria: (1) an ASD group and a DCD group, (2) an ASD + DCD group and a DCD group, or (3) ASD, ASD + DCD, and DCD groups. Results From the 1598 articles screened, 11 were included in the qualitative analysis. The articles included reported more differences than similarities in individuals with ASD and DCD, with clear distinctions for working memory ability, gestural performance, grip selection, and cortical thickness. Only two studies reported similarities in face processing abilities and perceived competence, and the interventional studies showed group similarities in behavior improvement, such as intelligence and attention. Conclusions Based on the articles reviewed, we conclude that while DCD and ASD share some behavioral symptoms, the symptom profiles of each disorder are unique and separable. We recommend that the evaluation of potential DCD in individuals with ASD be performed systematically and thoroughly, so as to distinguish this co-occurring condition from sensorimotor symptoms associated with ASD.

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KW - Motor skills

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