Behavioral and biochemical effects of job loss and unemployment stress

Raymond Fleming, Andrew Baum, Diane Reddy, Robert Joseph Gatchel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research on the effects of unemployment has focused upon both anticipation of job loss and long-term unemployment, typically using self-report and some biochemical measures of response to unemployment stress. The present study was concerned with behavioral and biochemical responses to unemployment. It was also designed to examine a somewhat different time course of unemployment than has been used in previous work. Results indicated that stress accompanies unemployment; looking at people who had been unemployed for up to four months, those who had been unemployed for greater lengths of time performed more poorly on a behavioral task and exhibited higher levels of urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine than did persons unemployed for shorter time periods or subjects who were employed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-17
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Human Stress
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1984

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Unemployment
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Fleming, Raymond ; Baum, Andrew ; Reddy, Diane ; Gatchel, Robert Joseph. / Behavioral and biochemical effects of job loss and unemployment stress. In: Journal of Human Stress. 1984 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 12-17.
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Behavioral and biochemical effects of job loss and unemployment stress. / Fleming, Raymond; Baum, Andrew; Reddy, Diane; Gatchel, Robert Joseph.

In: Journal of Human Stress, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.1984, p. 12-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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