Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tooth loss, and edentulism among adults in the United States: 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey

Nilanjana Dwibedi, R. Constance Wiener, Patricia A. Findley, Chan Shen, Usha Sambamoorthi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Adults with chronic respiratory conditions, specifically asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may be at risk of experiencing poor oral health due to systemic inflammation, challenges in routine oral health care, and adverse effects of medications used to treat these conditions. The authors examined the association of asthma, COPD, and coexisting asthma and COPD (asthma-COPD overlap syndrome [ACOS]) with tooth loss among US adults. Methods: The authors conducted a cross-sectional study using 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data (N = 387,217). The authors categorized the participants with missing permanent teeth into 4 groups: asthma only (n = 38,817), COPD only (n = 19,819), ACOS (n = 13,494), no asthma, no COPD (n = 315,087). The authors used adjusted multinomial logistic regressions to examine the associations between asthma and COPD categories and tooth loss. Results: According to the authors, 5.3% of study participants reported they were edentulous; 10.7% reported 6 or fewer missing teeth. Participants with asthma only, COPD only, and ACOS had higher odds of reporting tooth loss (6 or more teeth) than those in the no asthma, no COPD group; adjusted odds ratios were 1.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.26) to 2.04 (95% confidence interval, 1.85 to 2.26). A lower percentage of participants with COPD and ACOS visited dentists in the past year than those with no asthma and no COPD. Interactive associations suggested participants with asthma or COPD with dental visits were less likely to report edentulism than those with neither asthma nor COPD and no dental visits. Conclusions: Participants with asthma or COPD had higher odds of tooth loss compared with those with neither asthma nor COPD. Practical Implications: People with asthma or COPD should maintain routine dental visits to reduce the risk of experiencing tooth loss.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)735-744.e1
JournalJournal of the American Dental Association
Volume151
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • oral health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tooth loss, and edentulism among adults in the United States: 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this