Associations of Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors With Children's Health and Academic Problems

Xiangrong Shi, Larry Tubb, Sheryl T. Fingers, Shande Chen, James L. Caffrey

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15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We examined the associations of physical activities and dietary behaviors with children's health and academic-behavioral problems. Methods: We employed a Community-wide Children's Health Assessment and Planning Survey to examine physical activity, healthy meals, health status, and academic-behavioral problems in 3708 children 7 to 14 years of age. Statistical associations were examined with chi-square test and logistic regression analysis; we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Among these children, 30.2% were overweight-obese, 11.0% had academic problems, and 7.9% had behavioral problems. Children classified as healthy eaters were more likely to exercise ≥4 days/week (79.1% vs 64.6%, OR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.14 to 2.49), less likely to be overweight-obese (27.7% vs 44.6%, OR: 0.48, CI: 0.31 to 0.73), less likely to have academic problems (9.1% vs 16.1%, OR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.41 to 0.79) and behavioral problems (6.9% vs 13.9%, OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.32 to 0.66) compared with their less healthy eating peers. Physical activity and healthy meals were associated with an improved health status (p < .001). However, the proportions of children taking unhealthy meals or choosing sedentary lifestyle increased as the cohorts progressed (p < .05) from childhood (7 to 8 years) to adolescence (13 to 14 years). Conclusions: Healthy (or unhealthy) lifestyle behaviors are significantly interrelated. Children who take healthy meals and exercise often are associated with better health and fewer academic and behavioral problems. Unfortunately, taking unhealthy meals and sedentary lifestyle characterize a growing proportion of young adolescents. Thus, curbing unhealthy lifestyle behaviors should start in early childhood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Meals
meals
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
confidence
Sedentary Lifestyle
health
Health Status
Life Style
health status
Health Planning
childhood
Chi-Square Distribution
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Child Health
Problem Behavior
Physical Activity
Confidence Interval

Keywords

  • Behavioral problems
  • Dietary choices
  • Exercise
  • Sedentary lifestyle

Cite this

Shi, Xiangrong ; Tubb, Larry ; Fingers, Sheryl T. ; Chen, Shande ; Caffrey, James L. / Associations of Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors With Children's Health and Academic Problems. In: Journal of School Health. 2013 ; Vol. 83, No. 1. pp. 1-7.
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abstract = "Background: We examined the associations of physical activities and dietary behaviors with children's health and academic-behavioral problems. Methods: We employed a Community-wide Children's Health Assessment and Planning Survey to examine physical activity, healthy meals, health status, and academic-behavioral problems in 3708 children 7 to 14 years of age. Statistical associations were examined with chi-square test and logistic regression analysis; we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Among these children, 30.2{\%} were overweight-obese, 11.0{\%} had academic problems, and 7.9{\%} had behavioral problems. Children classified as healthy eaters were more likely to exercise ≥4 days/week (79.1{\%} vs 64.6{\%}, OR: 2.08, 95{\%} CI: 1.14 to 2.49), less likely to be overweight-obese (27.7{\%} vs 44.6{\%}, OR: 0.48, CI: 0.31 to 0.73), less likely to have academic problems (9.1{\%} vs 16.1{\%}, OR: 0.57, 95{\%} CI: 0.41 to 0.79) and behavioral problems (6.9{\%} vs 13.9{\%}, OR: 0.46, 95{\%} CI: 0.32 to 0.66) compared with their less healthy eating peers. Physical activity and healthy meals were associated with an improved health status (p < .001). However, the proportions of children taking unhealthy meals or choosing sedentary lifestyle increased as the cohorts progressed (p < .05) from childhood (7 to 8 years) to adolescence (13 to 14 years). Conclusions: Healthy (or unhealthy) lifestyle behaviors are significantly interrelated. Children who take healthy meals and exercise often are associated with better health and fewer academic and behavioral problems. Unfortunately, taking unhealthy meals and sedentary lifestyle characterize a growing proportion of young adolescents. Thus, curbing unhealthy lifestyle behaviors should start in early childhood.",
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Associations of Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors With Children's Health and Academic Problems. / Shi, Xiangrong; Tubb, Larry; Fingers, Sheryl T.; Chen, Shande; Caffrey, James L.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 83, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Background: We examined the associations of physical activities and dietary behaviors with children's health and academic-behavioral problems. Methods: We employed a Community-wide Children's Health Assessment and Planning Survey to examine physical activity, healthy meals, health status, and academic-behavioral problems in 3708 children 7 to 14 years of age. Statistical associations were examined with chi-square test and logistic regression analysis; we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Among these children, 30.2% were overweight-obese, 11.0% had academic problems, and 7.9% had behavioral problems. Children classified as healthy eaters were more likely to exercise ≥4 days/week (79.1% vs 64.6%, OR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.14 to 2.49), less likely to be overweight-obese (27.7% vs 44.6%, OR: 0.48, CI: 0.31 to 0.73), less likely to have academic problems (9.1% vs 16.1%, OR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.41 to 0.79) and behavioral problems (6.9% vs 13.9%, OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.32 to 0.66) compared with their less healthy eating peers. Physical activity and healthy meals were associated with an improved health status (p < .001). However, the proportions of children taking unhealthy meals or choosing sedentary lifestyle increased as the cohorts progressed (p < .05) from childhood (7 to 8 years) to adolescence (13 to 14 years). Conclusions: Healthy (or unhealthy) lifestyle behaviors are significantly interrelated. Children who take healthy meals and exercise often are associated with better health and fewer academic and behavioral problems. Unfortunately, taking unhealthy meals and sedentary lifestyle characterize a growing proportion of young adolescents. Thus, curbing unhealthy lifestyle behaviors should start in early childhood.

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