Application of a bogus testing procedure to determine college students' utilization of genetic screening for alcoholism

Dennis L. Thombs, Colleen A. Mahoney, R. Scott Olds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

A convenience sample of 181 college students took part in a quasi-experimental study that tested the use of genetic screening for alcoholism—a test that does not yet exist. A questionnaire was administered before and after the students viewed a presentation that accurately explained genetic susceptibility to alcoholism but misled them by offering “a newly available” test. Alcohol-related variables were assessed before the presentation. Test-seeking intention and reasons for and against testing were assessed after the presentation. Regression analysis found that being Caucasian, female, and somewhat older than traditional college age, and having a history of early drunkenness were significant predictors of testing intention. During the week following data collection, only 7 participants (4%) attempted to schedule a test. Implications of these findings and the ethical issues related to predictive screening for alcoholism in the college population are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-112
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American College Health Association
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1998

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • Genetic testing
  • Screening

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