An item response theory analysis of the Executive Interview and development of the EXIT8: A project FRONTIER study

Danielle R. Jahn, Jeffrey A. Dressel, Brandon E. Gavett, Sid E. O'Bryant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The Executive Interview (EXIT25) is an effective measure of executive dysfunction, but may be inefficient due to the time it takes to complete 25 interview-based items. The current study aimed to examine psychometric properties of the EXIT25, with a specific focus on determining whether a briefer version of the measure could comprehensively assess executive dysfunction. Method: The current study applied a graded response model (a type of item response theory model for polytomous categorical data) to identify items that were most closely related to the underlying construct of executive functioning and best discriminated between varying levels of executive functioning. Participants were 660 adults ages 40 to 96 years living in West Texas, who were recruited through an ongoing epidemiological study of rural health and aging, called Project FRONTIER. The EXIT25 was the primary measure examined. Participants also completed the Trail Making Test and Controlled Oral Word Association Test, among other measures, to examine the convergent validity of a brief form of the EXIT25. Results: Eight items were identified that provided the majority of the information about the underlying construct of executive functioning; total scores on these items were associated with total scores on other measures of executive functioning and were able to differentiate between cognitively healthy, mildly cognitively impaired, and demented participants. In addition, cutoff scores were recommended based on sensitivity and specificity of scores. Conclusion: A brief, eight-item version of the EXIT25 may be an effective and efficient screening for executive dysfunction among older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-242
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 16 Mar 2015

Fingerprint

Word Association Tests
Interviews
Trail Making Test
Rural Health
Psychometrics
Epidemiologic Studies
Sensitivity and Specificity

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Brief assessment
  • Cognition
  • Executive functioning
  • Item response theory

Cite this

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abstract = "Introduction: The Executive Interview (EXIT25) is an effective measure of executive dysfunction, but may be inefficient due to the time it takes to complete 25 interview-based items. The current study aimed to examine psychometric properties of the EXIT25, with a specific focus on determining whether a briefer version of the measure could comprehensively assess executive dysfunction. Method: The current study applied a graded response model (a type of item response theory model for polytomous categorical data) to identify items that were most closely related to the underlying construct of executive functioning and best discriminated between varying levels of executive functioning. Participants were 660 adults ages 40 to 96 years living in West Texas, who were recruited through an ongoing epidemiological study of rural health and aging, called Project FRONTIER. The EXIT25 was the primary measure examined. Participants also completed the Trail Making Test and Controlled Oral Word Association Test, among other measures, to examine the convergent validity of a brief form of the EXIT25. Results: Eight items were identified that provided the majority of the information about the underlying construct of executive functioning; total scores on these items were associated with total scores on other measures of executive functioning and were able to differentiate between cognitively healthy, mildly cognitively impaired, and demented participants. In addition, cutoff scores were recommended based on sensitivity and specificity of scores. Conclusion: A brief, eight-item version of the EXIT25 may be an effective and efficient screening for executive dysfunction among older adults.",
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An item response theory analysis of the Executive Interview and development of the EXIT8 : A project FRONTIER study. / Jahn, Danielle R.; Dressel, Jeffrey A.; Gavett, Brandon E.; O'Bryant, Sid E.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 37, No. 3, 16.03.2015, p. 229-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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