An impaired neuroimmune pathway promotes the development of hypertension in systemic lupus erythematosus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorder that affects nearly 2 million people in the United States. The majority of SLE cases occur in women at an age in which the prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease is typically low. However, women with SLE have a high prevalence of hypertension for reasons that remain unclear. Because immune cells and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both hypertension and SLE and because inflammation has been shown to be regulated by the autonomic nervous system, studies investigating neuroimmune mechanisms of hypertension could have direct and significant clinical implications. The purpose of this review is to introduce a recently described neuroimmune pathway and discuss its potential importance in the development of hypertension and renal injury during SLE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)R1074-R1077
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume309
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Autonomic dysfunction
  • Blood pressure
  • Cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus

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