An elective course in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health and practice issues

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To design, implement and assess a lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and practice elective course for second- and third-year Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students. Methods. The course focused on health promotion, health care barriers, disease prevention, and treatment throughout an LGBT person’s lifespan. The course included topic discussions, reading assignments, various active-learning activities, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with a transgender person, and guest speakers from the LGBT community. Five quizzes were administered during the course that were mapped to specific session learning objectives and course learning outcomes. Students completed an anonymous pre- and post-course survey on the seven course learning outcomes to assess their knowledge and skills regarding the health of LGBT people. Results. Students exhibited significant learning with improvement in the seven course learning outcomes. The two most improved course learning outcomes were the medications used for LGBT people and summarizing health care resources available to LGBT people. The content of student portfolios included general themes of discrimination, health care access problems, advocacy, inclusive pharmacy environments, and desire to be a better practitioner. More than 91% of the students actively engaged the guest speakers from the LGBT community. Student performance on quizzes and in the OSCE activity was excellent. The capstone presentations covered a variety of topics including LGBT in Islam. Conclusion. Students demonstrated knowledge of the unique health care issues among the LGBT community. This elective course provides a framework for other pharmacy programs to incorporate LGBT health topics into the curriculum and to engage with their local LGBT community.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6967
Pages (from-to)1723-1731
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical education
Volume83
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Transgender Persons
Health
health
health care
learning
student
quiz
community
Sexual Minorities
Learning
Students
examination
human being
learning objective
life-span
health promotion
Islam
Delivery of Health Care
medication
discrimination

Keywords

  • Bisexual
  • Gay
  • Lesbian
  • Queer
  • Transgender

Cite this

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title = "An elective course in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health and practice issues",
abstract = "Objective. To design, implement and assess a lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and practice elective course for second- and third-year Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students. Methods. The course focused on health promotion, health care barriers, disease prevention, and treatment throughout an LGBT person’s lifespan. The course included topic discussions, reading assignments, various active-learning activities, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with a transgender person, and guest speakers from the LGBT community. Five quizzes were administered during the course that were mapped to specific session learning objectives and course learning outcomes. Students completed an anonymous pre- and post-course survey on the seven course learning outcomes to assess their knowledge and skills regarding the health of LGBT people. Results. Students exhibited significant learning with improvement in the seven course learning outcomes. The two most improved course learning outcomes were the medications used for LGBT people and summarizing health care resources available to LGBT people. The content of student portfolios included general themes of discrimination, health care access problems, advocacy, inclusive pharmacy environments, and desire to be a better practitioner. More than 91{\%} of the students actively engaged the guest speakers from the LGBT community. Student performance on quizzes and in the OSCE activity was excellent. The capstone presentations covered a variety of topics including LGBT in Islam. Conclusion. Students demonstrated knowledge of the unique health care issues among the LGBT community. This elective course provides a framework for other pharmacy programs to incorporate LGBT health topics into the curriculum and to engage with their local LGBT community.",
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An elective course in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health and practice issues. / Jann, Michael W.; Penzak, Scott; White, Annesha; Tatachar, Amulya.

In: American journal of pharmaceutical education, Vol. 83, No. 8, 6967, 01.01.2019, p. 1723-1731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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