Alcohol-related cognitions: Implications for concurrent alcohol and marijuana use and concurrent alcohol and prescription stimulant misuse among young adults

Dana M. Litt, Ashley Lowery, Cassidy LoParco, Melissa A. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: This study examined the associations between alcohol-related cognitions within the social reaction pathway of the Prototype Willingness Model and concurrent (use of two or more substances within a specified time period) use of 1) alcohol and marijuana and 2) alcohol and prescription stimulant misuse. Methods: A convenience sample of 1,062 emerging adults in the U.S. (18–20 years old; 54.5% female) who reported past 3-month alcohol use completed a baseline survey as part of a larger randomized controlled trial. Results: Results indicate that controlling for age, biological sex, race, ethnicity, and college enrollment, perceived descriptive norms and willingness to drink were associated with past 3-month concurrent alcohol and marijuana use and concurrent alcohol and prescription stimulant misuse. However, alcohol prototype similarity and alcohol-related perceived vulnerability were not associated with either concurrent use outcome examined. Discussion: These findings suggest that alcohol-related perceived descriptive norms and willingness to drink are associated with concurrent substance use among young adults. Thus, it is possible that existing efficacious alcohol interventions that target descriptive norms and willingness to drink may have the added benefit of also reducing concurrent substance cognitions and ultimately use.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106946
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume119
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Cognitions
  • Concurrent Substance Use
  • Prototype Willingness Model
  • Young Adults

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