African-American inflammatory bowel disease in a Southern U.S. health center

Hemanth Veluswamy, Kunal Suryawala, Ankur Sheth, Shannon Wells, Erik Salvatierra, Walter Cromer, Ganta V. Chaitanya, Annette Painter, Mihir Patel, Kenneth Manas, Ellenmarie Zwank, Moheb Boktor, Kondal Baig, Balaji Datti, James Michael Mathis, Alireza Minagar, Paul A. Jordan, Jonathan S. Alexander

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Abstract

Background: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) remain significant health problems in the US and worldwide. IBD is most often associated with eastern European ancestry, and is less frequently reported in other populations of African origin e.g. African Americans ('AAs'). Whether AAs represent an important population with IBD in the US remains unclear since few studies have investigated IBD in communities with a majority representation of AA patients. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport (LSUHSC-S) is a tertiary care medical center, with a patient base composed of 58% AA and 39% Caucasian (W), ideal for evaluating racial (AA vs. W) as well and gender (M vs. F) influences on IBD.Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated 951 visits to LSUHSC-S for IBD (between 2000 to 2008) using non-identified patient information based on ICD-9 medical record coding (Crohn's disease 'CD'-555.0- 555.9 and ulcerative colitis 'UC'-556.0-556.9).Results: Overall, there were more cases of CD seen than UC. UC and CD affected similar ratios of AA and Caucasian males (M) and females (F) with a rank order of WF > WM > AAF > AAM. Interestingly, in CD, we found that annual visits per person was the highest in AA M (10.7 ± 1.7); significantly higher (*; -p < 0.05) than in WM (6.3 ± 1.0). Further, in CD, the female to male (F: M) ratio in AA was significantly higher (*;- p < 0.05) (1.9 ± 0.2) than in Caucasians (F:M = 1.3 ± 0.1) suggesting a female dominance in AACD; no differences were seen in UC F: M ratios.Conclusion: Although Caucasians still represent the greatest fraction of IBD (~64%), AAs with IBD made up >1/3 (36.4%) of annual IBD cases from 2000-2008 at LSUHSC-S. Further studies on genetic and environments risks for IBD risk in AAs are needed to understand differences in presentation and progression in AAs and other 'non-traditional' populations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106
JournalBMC Gastroenterology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - 9 Sep 2010

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
African Americans
Health
Population
International Classification of Diseases
Ulcerative Colitis
Tertiary Care Centers
Crohn Disease
Clinical Coding
Medical Records
Retrospective Studies

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Veluswamy, H., Suryawala, K., Sheth, A., Wells, S., Salvatierra, E., Cromer, W., ... Alexander, J. S. (2010). African-American inflammatory bowel disease in a Southern U.S. health center. BMC Gastroenterology, 10, [106]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-10-106
Veluswamy, Hemanth ; Suryawala, Kunal ; Sheth, Ankur ; Wells, Shannon ; Salvatierra, Erik ; Cromer, Walter ; Chaitanya, Ganta V. ; Painter, Annette ; Patel, Mihir ; Manas, Kenneth ; Zwank, Ellenmarie ; Boktor, Moheb ; Baig, Kondal ; Datti, Balaji ; Mathis, James Michael ; Minagar, Alireza ; Jordan, Paul A. ; Alexander, Jonathan S. / African-American inflammatory bowel disease in a Southern U.S. health center. In: BMC Gastroenterology. 2010 ; Vol. 10.
@article{b0fa37fefb584629999fbddf469bae87,
title = "African-American inflammatory bowel disease in a Southern U.S. health center",
abstract = "Background: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) remain significant health problems in the US and worldwide. IBD is most often associated with eastern European ancestry, and is less frequently reported in other populations of African origin e.g. African Americans ('AAs'). Whether AAs represent an important population with IBD in the US remains unclear since few studies have investigated IBD in communities with a majority representation of AA patients. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport (LSUHSC-S) is a tertiary care medical center, with a patient base composed of 58{\%} AA and 39{\%} Caucasian (W), ideal for evaluating racial (AA vs. W) as well and gender (M vs. F) influences on IBD.Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated 951 visits to LSUHSC-S for IBD (between 2000 to 2008) using non-identified patient information based on ICD-9 medical record coding (Crohn's disease 'CD'-555.0- 555.9 and ulcerative colitis 'UC'-556.0-556.9).Results: Overall, there were more cases of CD seen than UC. UC and CD affected similar ratios of AA and Caucasian males (M) and females (F) with a rank order of WF > WM > AAF > AAM. Interestingly, in CD, we found that annual visits per person was the highest in AA M (10.7 ± 1.7); significantly higher (*; -p < 0.05) than in WM (6.3 ± 1.0). Further, in CD, the female to male (F: M) ratio in AA was significantly higher (*;- p < 0.05) (1.9 ± 0.2) than in Caucasians (F:M = 1.3 ± 0.1) suggesting a female dominance in AACD; no differences were seen in UC F: M ratios.Conclusion: Although Caucasians still represent the greatest fraction of IBD (~64{\%}), AAs with IBD made up >1/3 (36.4{\%}) of annual IBD cases from 2000-2008 at LSUHSC-S. Further studies on genetic and environments risks for IBD risk in AAs are needed to understand differences in presentation and progression in AAs and other 'non-traditional' populations.",
author = "Hemanth Veluswamy and Kunal Suryawala and Ankur Sheth and Shannon Wells and Erik Salvatierra and Walter Cromer and Chaitanya, {Ganta V.} and Annette Painter and Mihir Patel and Kenneth Manas and Ellenmarie Zwank and Moheb Boktor and Kondal Baig and Balaji Datti and Mathis, {James Michael} and Alireza Minagar and Jordan, {Paul A.} and Alexander, {Jonathan S.}",
year = "2010",
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doi = "10.1186/1471-230X-10-106",
language = "English",
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journal = "BMC Gastroenterology",
issn = "1471-230X",
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Veluswamy, H, Suryawala, K, Sheth, A, Wells, S, Salvatierra, E, Cromer, W, Chaitanya, GV, Painter, A, Patel, M, Manas, K, Zwank, E, Boktor, M, Baig, K, Datti, B, Mathis, JM, Minagar, A, Jordan, PA & Alexander, JS 2010, 'African-American inflammatory bowel disease in a Southern U.S. health center', BMC Gastroenterology, vol. 10, 106. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-10-106

African-American inflammatory bowel disease in a Southern U.S. health center. / Veluswamy, Hemanth; Suryawala, Kunal; Sheth, Ankur; Wells, Shannon; Salvatierra, Erik; Cromer, Walter; Chaitanya, Ganta V.; Painter, Annette; Patel, Mihir; Manas, Kenneth; Zwank, Ellenmarie; Boktor, Moheb; Baig, Kondal; Datti, Balaji; Mathis, James Michael; Minagar, Alireza; Jordan, Paul A.; Alexander, Jonathan S.

In: BMC Gastroenterology, Vol. 10, 106, 09.09.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - African-American inflammatory bowel disease in a Southern U.S. health center

AU - Veluswamy, Hemanth

AU - Suryawala, Kunal

AU - Sheth, Ankur

AU - Wells, Shannon

AU - Salvatierra, Erik

AU - Cromer, Walter

AU - Chaitanya, Ganta V.

AU - Painter, Annette

AU - Patel, Mihir

AU - Manas, Kenneth

AU - Zwank, Ellenmarie

AU - Boktor, Moheb

AU - Baig, Kondal

AU - Datti, Balaji

AU - Mathis, James Michael

AU - Minagar, Alireza

AU - Jordan, Paul A.

AU - Alexander, Jonathan S.

PY - 2010/9/9

Y1 - 2010/9/9

N2 - Background: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) remain significant health problems in the US and worldwide. IBD is most often associated with eastern European ancestry, and is less frequently reported in other populations of African origin e.g. African Americans ('AAs'). Whether AAs represent an important population with IBD in the US remains unclear since few studies have investigated IBD in communities with a majority representation of AA patients. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport (LSUHSC-S) is a tertiary care medical center, with a patient base composed of 58% AA and 39% Caucasian (W), ideal for evaluating racial (AA vs. W) as well and gender (M vs. F) influences on IBD.Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated 951 visits to LSUHSC-S for IBD (between 2000 to 2008) using non-identified patient information based on ICD-9 medical record coding (Crohn's disease 'CD'-555.0- 555.9 and ulcerative colitis 'UC'-556.0-556.9).Results: Overall, there were more cases of CD seen than UC. UC and CD affected similar ratios of AA and Caucasian males (M) and females (F) with a rank order of WF > WM > AAF > AAM. Interestingly, in CD, we found that annual visits per person was the highest in AA M (10.7 ± 1.7); significantly higher (*; -p < 0.05) than in WM (6.3 ± 1.0). Further, in CD, the female to male (F: M) ratio in AA was significantly higher (*;- p < 0.05) (1.9 ± 0.2) than in Caucasians (F:M = 1.3 ± 0.1) suggesting a female dominance in AACD; no differences were seen in UC F: M ratios.Conclusion: Although Caucasians still represent the greatest fraction of IBD (~64%), AAs with IBD made up >1/3 (36.4%) of annual IBD cases from 2000-2008 at LSUHSC-S. Further studies on genetic and environments risks for IBD risk in AAs are needed to understand differences in presentation and progression in AAs and other 'non-traditional' populations.

AB - Background: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) remain significant health problems in the US and worldwide. IBD is most often associated with eastern European ancestry, and is less frequently reported in other populations of African origin e.g. African Americans ('AAs'). Whether AAs represent an important population with IBD in the US remains unclear since few studies have investigated IBD in communities with a majority representation of AA patients. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport (LSUHSC-S) is a tertiary care medical center, with a patient base composed of 58% AA and 39% Caucasian (W), ideal for evaluating racial (AA vs. W) as well and gender (M vs. F) influences on IBD.Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated 951 visits to LSUHSC-S for IBD (between 2000 to 2008) using non-identified patient information based on ICD-9 medical record coding (Crohn's disease 'CD'-555.0- 555.9 and ulcerative colitis 'UC'-556.0-556.9).Results: Overall, there were more cases of CD seen than UC. UC and CD affected similar ratios of AA and Caucasian males (M) and females (F) with a rank order of WF > WM > AAF > AAM. Interestingly, in CD, we found that annual visits per person was the highest in AA M (10.7 ± 1.7); significantly higher (*; -p < 0.05) than in WM (6.3 ± 1.0). Further, in CD, the female to male (F: M) ratio in AA was significantly higher (*;- p < 0.05) (1.9 ± 0.2) than in Caucasians (F:M = 1.3 ± 0.1) suggesting a female dominance in AACD; no differences were seen in UC F: M ratios.Conclusion: Although Caucasians still represent the greatest fraction of IBD (~64%), AAs with IBD made up >1/3 (36.4%) of annual IBD cases from 2000-2008 at LSUHSC-S. Further studies on genetic and environments risks for IBD risk in AAs are needed to understand differences in presentation and progression in AAs and other 'non-traditional' populations.

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DO - 10.1186/1471-230X-10-106

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JO - BMC Gastroenterology

JF - BMC Gastroenterology

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Veluswamy H, Suryawala K, Sheth A, Wells S, Salvatierra E, Cromer W et al. African-American inflammatory bowel disease in a Southern U.S. health center. BMC Gastroenterology. 2010 Sep 9;10. 106. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-10-106