Abdominal lymphatic pump treatment increases leukocyte count and flux in thoracic duct lymph

Lisa Michelle Hodge, Hollis H. King, Arthur G. Williams, Stephanie J. Reder, Tejaswi Belavadi, Jerry Simecka, Scott T. Stoll, H. Fred Downey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous studies suggest that rhythmic compression of the abdomen (abdominal lymphatic pump techniques, LPT) enhances immunity and resistance to infectious disease, but direct evidence of this has not been documented. In this study, the thoracic duct of eight anesthetized mongrel dogs was catheterized, so the immediate effects of LPT on lymph flow and leukocyte output could be measured. Methods and Results: Lymph flow was measured by timed collection or ultrasonic flowmeter, and lymph was collected over ice under 1) resting (baseline) conditions, and 2) during application of LPT. The baseline leukocyte count was 4.8 ± 1.7 × 10 6 cells/ml of lymph, and LPT significantly increased leukocytes to 11.8 ± 3.6 × 10 6 cells/ml. Flow cytometry and differential cell staining revealed that numbers of macrophages, neutrophils, total lymphocytes, T cells and B cells were similarly increased during LPT. Furthermore, LPT significantly enhanced lymph flow from 1.13 ± 0.44 ml/min to 4.14 ± 1.29 ml/min. Leukocyte flux, computed from the product of lymph flow and cell count, was increased by LPT from 8.2 ± 4.1 × 10 6 to 60 ± 25 × 10 6 total cells/min. Similar trends were observed in macrophages, neutrophils, total lymphocytes, T cells and B cells during LPT. Conclusions: LPT significantly increased both thoracic duct lymph flow and leukocyte count, so lymph leukocyte flux was markedly enhanced. Increased mobilization of immune cells is likely and important mechanism responsible for the enhanced immunity and recovery from infection of patients treated with LPT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalLymphatic Research and Biology
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2007

Fingerprint

Thoracic Duct
Lymph
Leukocyte Count
Leukocytes
Immunity
Neutrophils
B-Lymphocytes
Macrophages
Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
Flowmeters
Ice
Ultrasonics
Abdomen
Communicable Diseases
Flow Cytometry
Cell Count
Dogs
Staining and Labeling
Infection

Cite this

Hodge, Lisa Michelle ; King, Hollis H. ; Williams, Arthur G. ; Reder, Stephanie J. ; Belavadi, Tejaswi ; Simecka, Jerry ; Stoll, Scott T. ; Downey, H. Fred. / Abdominal lymphatic pump treatment increases leukocyte count and flux in thoracic duct lymph. In: Lymphatic Research and Biology. 2007 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 127-133.
@article{e495fc884a5e4535a8c08f1cd13e3403,
title = "Abdominal lymphatic pump treatment increases leukocyte count and flux in thoracic duct lymph",
abstract = "Background: Previous studies suggest that rhythmic compression of the abdomen (abdominal lymphatic pump techniques, LPT) enhances immunity and resistance to infectious disease, but direct evidence of this has not been documented. In this study, the thoracic duct of eight anesthetized mongrel dogs was catheterized, so the immediate effects of LPT on lymph flow and leukocyte output could be measured. Methods and Results: Lymph flow was measured by timed collection or ultrasonic flowmeter, and lymph was collected over ice under 1) resting (baseline) conditions, and 2) during application of LPT. The baseline leukocyte count was 4.8 ± 1.7 × 10 6 cells/ml of lymph, and LPT significantly increased leukocytes to 11.8 ± 3.6 × 10 6 cells/ml. Flow cytometry and differential cell staining revealed that numbers of macrophages, neutrophils, total lymphocytes, T cells and B cells were similarly increased during LPT. Furthermore, LPT significantly enhanced lymph flow from 1.13 ± 0.44 ml/min to 4.14 ± 1.29 ml/min. Leukocyte flux, computed from the product of lymph flow and cell count, was increased by LPT from 8.2 ± 4.1 × 10 6 to 60 ± 25 × 10 6 total cells/min. Similar trends were observed in macrophages, neutrophils, total lymphocytes, T cells and B cells during LPT. Conclusions: LPT significantly increased both thoracic duct lymph flow and leukocyte count, so lymph leukocyte flux was markedly enhanced. Increased mobilization of immune cells is likely and important mechanism responsible for the enhanced immunity and recovery from infection of patients treated with LPT.",
author = "Hodge, {Lisa Michelle} and King, {Hollis H.} and Williams, {Arthur G.} and Reder, {Stephanie J.} and Tejaswi Belavadi and Jerry Simecka and Stoll, {Scott T.} and Downey, {H. Fred}",
year = "2007",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/lrb.2007.1001",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "127--133",
journal = "Lymphatic Research and Biology",
issn = "1539-6851",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Abdominal lymphatic pump treatment increases leukocyte count and flux in thoracic duct lymph. / Hodge, Lisa Michelle; King, Hollis H.; Williams, Arthur G.; Reder, Stephanie J.; Belavadi, Tejaswi; Simecka, Jerry; Stoll, Scott T.; Downey, H. Fred.

In: Lymphatic Research and Biology, Vol. 5, No. 2, 01.06.2007, p. 127-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abdominal lymphatic pump treatment increases leukocyte count and flux in thoracic duct lymph

AU - Hodge, Lisa Michelle

AU - King, Hollis H.

AU - Williams, Arthur G.

AU - Reder, Stephanie J.

AU - Belavadi, Tejaswi

AU - Simecka, Jerry

AU - Stoll, Scott T.

AU - Downey, H. Fred

PY - 2007/6/1

Y1 - 2007/6/1

N2 - Background: Previous studies suggest that rhythmic compression of the abdomen (abdominal lymphatic pump techniques, LPT) enhances immunity and resistance to infectious disease, but direct evidence of this has not been documented. In this study, the thoracic duct of eight anesthetized mongrel dogs was catheterized, so the immediate effects of LPT on lymph flow and leukocyte output could be measured. Methods and Results: Lymph flow was measured by timed collection or ultrasonic flowmeter, and lymph was collected over ice under 1) resting (baseline) conditions, and 2) during application of LPT. The baseline leukocyte count was 4.8 ± 1.7 × 10 6 cells/ml of lymph, and LPT significantly increased leukocytes to 11.8 ± 3.6 × 10 6 cells/ml. Flow cytometry and differential cell staining revealed that numbers of macrophages, neutrophils, total lymphocytes, T cells and B cells were similarly increased during LPT. Furthermore, LPT significantly enhanced lymph flow from 1.13 ± 0.44 ml/min to 4.14 ± 1.29 ml/min. Leukocyte flux, computed from the product of lymph flow and cell count, was increased by LPT from 8.2 ± 4.1 × 10 6 to 60 ± 25 × 10 6 total cells/min. Similar trends were observed in macrophages, neutrophils, total lymphocytes, T cells and B cells during LPT. Conclusions: LPT significantly increased both thoracic duct lymph flow and leukocyte count, so lymph leukocyte flux was markedly enhanced. Increased mobilization of immune cells is likely and important mechanism responsible for the enhanced immunity and recovery from infection of patients treated with LPT.

AB - Background: Previous studies suggest that rhythmic compression of the abdomen (abdominal lymphatic pump techniques, LPT) enhances immunity and resistance to infectious disease, but direct evidence of this has not been documented. In this study, the thoracic duct of eight anesthetized mongrel dogs was catheterized, so the immediate effects of LPT on lymph flow and leukocyte output could be measured. Methods and Results: Lymph flow was measured by timed collection or ultrasonic flowmeter, and lymph was collected over ice under 1) resting (baseline) conditions, and 2) during application of LPT. The baseline leukocyte count was 4.8 ± 1.7 × 10 6 cells/ml of lymph, and LPT significantly increased leukocytes to 11.8 ± 3.6 × 10 6 cells/ml. Flow cytometry and differential cell staining revealed that numbers of macrophages, neutrophils, total lymphocytes, T cells and B cells were similarly increased during LPT. Furthermore, LPT significantly enhanced lymph flow from 1.13 ± 0.44 ml/min to 4.14 ± 1.29 ml/min. Leukocyte flux, computed from the product of lymph flow and cell count, was increased by LPT from 8.2 ± 4.1 × 10 6 to 60 ± 25 × 10 6 total cells/min. Similar trends were observed in macrophages, neutrophils, total lymphocytes, T cells and B cells during LPT. Conclusions: LPT significantly increased both thoracic duct lymph flow and leukocyte count, so lymph leukocyte flux was markedly enhanced. Increased mobilization of immune cells is likely and important mechanism responsible for the enhanced immunity and recovery from infection of patients treated with LPT.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35348919680&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/lrb.2007.1001

DO - 10.1089/lrb.2007.1001

M3 - Article

C2 - 17935480

AN - SCOPUS:35348919680

VL - 5

SP - 127

EP - 133

JO - Lymphatic Research and Biology

JF - Lymphatic Research and Biology

SN - 1539-6851

IS - 2

ER -