A systematic approach to team creation and peer evaluation in a large classroom setting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: There is limited data to support a particular method for optimal team creation in pharmacy education. We aimed to implement and evaluate a systematic approach to team creation and compare the impact on team dynamics to teams created via random selection. Methods: Two concurrent courses were used to assess team creation methods. Student-specific variables were used for team creation in one course while another course utilized teams created via random allocation. Each course conducted similar peer evaluations to provide feedback and assess team dynamics. A matched pre- and post-course survey assessed changes in student perceptions of team creation and peer evaluation. Student-perceived team effectiveness and individual coursework performance were assessed. Results: A total of 109 students were enrolled in each of the two courses, with 98% and 93% providing evaluation of team dynamics within the intervention and control methods, respectively. Students perceived better team effectiveness in intervention-created groups in relation to decreased task (p < 0.01), relationship (p < 0.01), and process conflict (p < 0.01), along with increased task attraction (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in student performance on individual examinations team creation methods (p = 0.17). Conclusions: A systematic approach to team creation improved student-perceived team dynamics with no significant impact on coursework scores. A systematic approach to team creation via a web-based platform is feasible in a large classroom setting and may provide an avenue for assessment approaches related to teamwork and team dynamics.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCurrents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

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Pharmacy Education
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Keywords

  • CATME
  • Peer evaluation
  • Team based learning
  • Team creation
  • Team dynamics

Cite this

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title = "A systematic approach to team creation and peer evaluation in a large classroom setting",
abstract = "Introduction: There is limited data to support a particular method for optimal team creation in pharmacy education. We aimed to implement and evaluate a systematic approach to team creation and compare the impact on team dynamics to teams created via random selection. Methods: Two concurrent courses were used to assess team creation methods. Student-specific variables were used for team creation in one course while another course utilized teams created via random allocation. Each course conducted similar peer evaluations to provide feedback and assess team dynamics. A matched pre- and post-course survey assessed changes in student perceptions of team creation and peer evaluation. Student-perceived team effectiveness and individual coursework performance were assessed. Results: A total of 109 students were enrolled in each of the two courses, with 98{\%} and 93{\%} providing evaluation of team dynamics within the intervention and control methods, respectively. Students perceived better team effectiveness in intervention-created groups in relation to decreased task (p < 0.01), relationship (p < 0.01), and process conflict (p < 0.01), along with increased task attraction (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in student performance on individual examinations team creation methods (p = 0.17). Conclusions: A systematic approach to team creation improved student-perceived team dynamics with no significant impact on coursework scores. A systematic approach to team creation via a web-based platform is feasible in a large classroom setting and may provide an avenue for assessment approaches related to teamwork and team dynamics.",
keywords = "CATME, Peer evaluation, Team based learning, Team creation, Team dynamics",
author = "Gaviola, {Marian L.} and Adenike Atanda and Howard, {Meredith L.} and Yuet, {Wei C.}",
year = "2019",
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doi = "10.1016/j.cptl.2019.09.008",
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AB - Introduction: There is limited data to support a particular method for optimal team creation in pharmacy education. We aimed to implement and evaluate a systematic approach to team creation and compare the impact on team dynamics to teams created via random selection. Methods: Two concurrent courses were used to assess team creation methods. Student-specific variables were used for team creation in one course while another course utilized teams created via random allocation. Each course conducted similar peer evaluations to provide feedback and assess team dynamics. A matched pre- and post-course survey assessed changes in student perceptions of team creation and peer evaluation. Student-perceived team effectiveness and individual coursework performance were assessed. Results: A total of 109 students were enrolled in each of the two courses, with 98% and 93% providing evaluation of team dynamics within the intervention and control methods, respectively. Students perceived better team effectiveness in intervention-created groups in relation to decreased task (p < 0.01), relationship (p < 0.01), and process conflict (p < 0.01), along with increased task attraction (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in student performance on individual examinations team creation methods (p = 0.17). Conclusions: A systematic approach to team creation improved student-perceived team dynamics with no significant impact on coursework scores. A systematic approach to team creation via a web-based platform is feasible in a large classroom setting and may provide an avenue for assessment approaches related to teamwork and team dynamics.

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