A persistent sodium current in acutely isolated histaminergic neurons from rat hypothalamus

Victor V. Uteshev-Gaard, D. R. Stevens, H. L. Haas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Histamine neurons acutely dissociated from the tuberomammillary nucleus of the rat hypothalamus were studied in whole-cell and cell-attached patch-clamp experiments. Electrophysiological properties of dissociated cells were found to be similar to those recorded in slice experiments using microelectrodes. Tuberomammillary neurons fired spontaneously and this activity persisted when Cs+ (1.5 mM) was added to, or when K+ was removed from the extracellular solution. In whole-cell experiments a persistent tetrodotoxin-sensitive inward current was recorded. In cell attached recordings voltage-gated sodium channels displayed either normal or non-inactivating behavior. These results provide a further analysis of the properties of histaminergic neurons and indicate that spontaneous activity is intrinsic to individual neurons. Evidence for a non-inactivating tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current is presented. Single channel recordings indicate that this current is the result of non-inactivating behavior of sodium channels. Such a current is well suited for biasing tuberomammillary neurons toward spontaneous activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-149
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroscience
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1995

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Hypothalamus
Sodium
Neurons
Tetrodotoxin
Lateral Hypothalamic Area
Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels
Sodium Channels
Microelectrodes
Histamine

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A persistent sodium current in acutely isolated histaminergic neurons from rat hypothalamus. / Uteshev-Gaard, Victor V.; Stevens, D. R.; Haas, H. L.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 66, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 143-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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